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Yesterday my friend Raissa and I performed a duet at a Halloween belly dance event called Spooktacular hosted by legendary dancer Layla Mary. It was so much fun!  Raissa and I decided to be elves – Lord of the Rings style. We wore elf ears and capes and danced with candles to Ocean Depth from the album Music from Intro to Bellydance with Dolphina.

After yesterday I started thinking about what it takes to make a really good duet. When we first began choreographing our dance Raissa sent me a video of a hip hop duet : Alex and Twitch. This video has all of the elements needed to pull off a duet (watch below!). The duo move together and in opposition. At some points they are doing different things, but those different things work perfectly together and create a dance thats completely in sync and on beat. Then they come back together and move simultaneously. All these different dynamics make for a very entertaining dance that holds the audiences interest.

Dancing in a duet can be nerve racking, well at least for me. I hate the idea of messing up and it effecting the other person. That’s why it’s so important to dance with someone you really trust. Especially when dancing with fire lol. Seriously though, trust is key!

Communication is also a must. When choreographing, it’s important to really hear each others ideas and test them out. When I was in design school, one of my teachers said the most important element of design is play. Never be afraid to play around, experiment, etc. I think about that all the time with dance.

Of course there are so many elements that make a great duet, and I’ve put together a video playlist of some very inspirational duos. There are, hip hop, modern, ballet  and belly dance duets.

Check them out!

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjrrLz1h3299FwymbBT9aoKrip-ugSpyn]

Let me know what you think!

xoxo

TBB

 

Yesterday I headed uptown to see my friend Shirae dance. She is part of a modern dance company directed by  Darnetha Lincoln M’Baye that works with Afro- contemporary styles. Shirae is an awesome dancer (which she proved to me last year when we went to a party and she got into a break dance battle lol), she’s been dancing since she was a kid, so I knew I was in for a good show. The group performed 3 different numbers, each with a different feeling. The choreography was beautiful, dynamic and captivating. As I was watching the dancers, I couldn’t help but think about how their sweeping arm movements, twists and spins, would translate into belly dance. I know a lot of belly dancers have a background in modern and ballet, but for those of us that don’t, it’s always cool to observe other forms of dance and get inspired!

xoxo

TBB

SO GO AHEAD – GET INSPIRED- WATCH CLIPS CHOREOGRAPHED BY DARNETHA !

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

I know it’s technically Friday…but whatever..today’s #TBT is inspired by my interview with Alia Thabit! Ibrahim, or Bobby, as he was called by his family and friends, was one of Alia’s first teachers and mentors. In fact, he was a mentor to many in NYC and around the world.

So Here’s The Deal: 

In 1939, Robert Ibrahim Farrah was born in Western Pennsylvania to Lebanese parents. When he was just a little boy, he would dance and perform at family parties. Cute tidbit, Farrah considered his mother to be his first dance teacher 🙂 Ibrahim carried this love of dance with him into adulthood.

In 1957, Ibrahim attended college at Penn State and earned his bachelor’s in American History. A love of history would play a huge part in Ibrahim’s life, although… not American.

After graduating Farrah took a 6 week trip to Lebanon and then moved to Washington D.C.

It was in D.C. that Ibrahim met dancer Adriana, who encouraged him and became his mentor. Farrah began performing at places like The Syrian Club, he also began teaching and was a drummer + M.C. at Club Suez.

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