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One of my favorite parts of visiting the Serena Belly Dance Museum was seeing all of her old albums. Take a look and listen to the belly beats playlist! Enjoy!

 

 

 

There are still several albums that I can’t find recordings of online, but you can order the vinyl if it interests you.

Here are some of the albums that were not on Spotify, but are on itunes.

The Greek Way – Gus Vali: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/the-greek-way/id979494971

Festive Dance Music From The Middle East – Eddie “The Sheik” Kochak & Hakki Obadia Orchestra: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/festive-dance-music-from-middle/id1004020686

Exotic Belly Dancers – Middle Eastern Ensemble: https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/exotic-belly-dances-classics/id268865865

 

 

 

 

 

 

*please note all of John’s amazing music is not available on spotify – for more music go here*

This playlist is in tribute to the life and music of legendary oud player, John Bilezikjian. I was sad to hear the news of his recent passing and wanted to do something to honor him here on TBB.

John’s music is an inspiration to dancers and musicians around the world. It’s full of beauty, complexities, and depth. His is the kind of music that makes you close your eyes and feel every strum of his oud.

Just a brief bio: John was an Armenian American based in L.A. Aside from being a master of the oud, John also played violin, mandolin, dumbek and bouzouki. He sang in Armenian, Turkish, Assyrian/Syriac and English. His other accomplishments include: starting his own record label – Dantz Records, collaborating with Leonard Cohen, Robert Palmer, Luis Miguel, Placido Domingo, Armen Chakmakian and Brothers of the Baladi, playing in several orchestras- Los Angeles Philharmonic Orchestra, The Los Angeles Mandolin Orchestra, The Pacific Palisades Symphany, Boston Pops Orchestra, and Pasedena Pops Orchestra.

Alright guys, I’m gonna go dance to this playlist, hope you all enjoy. <3

As a follow up to my latest post ” The Art Of The Drum Solo,” I thought it would be fun if this weeks #bellybeatz playlist was all drum solos – yiiiiiiip! Listen below + tell me what you’re favorite drum solos are – I will add them to the playlist! 🙂


Also, just as a side note check out Isreali pop star Sarit Hadad kill it on the darbuka  – bad.ass.

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Today I edited my first song, Batwannes Beek, by Warda. It was very daunting thinking that I had to cut an 8 minute song in half – especially Batwannes Beek…I’m still not sure if it sounds perfect – but the point is, there’s a way to do it!

For those of you with macs, I found awesome instructions online that are so easy to follow!

And S/O to Lili Zayda for sending me on the right track!

xoxo

N

 

Hey guys! So I finally got to post this week! yay!

Last week when I was updating the blogs color story I was using a book called “Living In Morocco” for inspiration. The images in the book are unreal – just completely stunning. If you don’t have it in your collection, I highly recommend you getting it here. At least with me, bellydancespiration extends beyond the dance itself and trickles into home decor, fashion etc. So I hope you enjoy and get some ideas! My personal favorites are the blue gilt sofa against the blue wall, the babooshes and the luxurious salon – but I don’t know… I love them all! Let me know what you think! ( I also snuck in an image from Vogue… couldn’t help it…)

Oh  – and to add to the mood…so you can imagine yourself sitting poolside, drink in hand, in a luxurious home in Morocco – listen to the playlist below.  The album in the playlist is all Moroccan belly dance and was introduced to me by Anahid Sofian – it’s sooo good!

xoxo

N

Bellyrical

I was introduced to Bellyrical on twitter. It’s Japanese belly dance music by DJ Cool-K, and I LOVE LOVE LOVE it!

Listen here and get yo groove on!

 

 

[youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iAELfyc22Ek]

What do you think of her music???

Asmahanآمال الأطرش‎, the famous Syrian/Egyptian singer, was born Nov. 25, 1912 (the year of her birth is debated). She was born in a time of political turmoil into a very politically active family, the al-Atrash clan. Her father was Fahd al-Atrash of Syrian Druze ancestry from Suwayda. Her mother was Alia Al-Mundhir of a Lebanese Druze family from Hasbaya (wondering who the Druze are? click here). Her father’s family was well known in Syria for it’s role in the resistance against the French mandate. Right before Asmahan was born, her family was in Turkey as her grandfather was a governor in Demirci. Due to danger, her family had to flee the country and took a ship from Izmir to Beirut. Asmahan was born on board and named Amal, meaning hope.

Her family’s new home town of Al-Qrayya, Syria, was bombed circa 1923 and Alia, Asmahan’s mother fled with  her children to Damascus, then to Beirut, and finally to Egypt, where she knew she was allowed to enter the country due to her husbands ties with the prime minister Saad Zaghloul. In Cairo Asmahan attended a French Catholic school that was paid for by a mysterious benefactor.read more

I don’t know much about Ensemble Huseyin Turkmenler except I like their music, and since Aszmara mentioned them in her interview, I thought they would be perfect for this weeks Belly Beats playlist 🙂

Enjoy + Have a great weekend!!!

xo

TBB

 

 

[youtube http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLjrrLz1h3299nfMwnSHatW0sb304ts7yd]

Shaabi music, meaning “music of the people,” came out of Cairo in the 1970’s. Artists that sang Shaabi were often the first of their families to live in the city. They brought with them their knowledge of Beledi music and added a more contemporary feel with lyrics that expressed their political frustrations, sexuality and social commentary.

For context, Shaabi came out at the same time as Rai in Algeria, Punk in the U.S. and Reggae in Jamaica. It also followed the passing of very influential classical musicians like Oum Kalthoum. It was the end of an era, and the beginning of a new one in Egypt and around the world. It was a time of revolution and music was a way to vocalize the feelings of the youth.

Shaabi was mainly distributed by CD and Cassette  – bootleg style. This way it was easy to self produce and promote and censorship by the Egyptian government could be avoided.

Some of the most famous Shaabi singers were Ahmed Adaweya, also known as the Godfather of Shaabi, Hakim, and Saad Al Soghayar. Ahmed was known for his emotional mawal, or vocal improv, at the beginning of his songs.

Read more about Shaabi here.

BUY “YALLA” – CLASSIC SHAABI CD!

LISTEN TO THE BELLY BEATS PLAYLIST: